Can I Bring My Dog to the United States?

The Centers for Disease Control is the American authoritative agency that governs the importation of animals into the United States, including pets such as dogs that you bring into the United States when you immigrate to the United States.

Bringing a dog into the United States when you immigrate to the United States isn’t overly complicated, but you will definitely want to make sure that all of your necessary documents are in order, otherwise you and your dog could be denied entry to the United States. Immigrate with a Dog

How to bring your dog into the United States when you immigrate to the United States

1. Ensure your dog is healthy and not carrying an infectious disease before immigrating to the United States with your dog. While you do not necessarily have to provide a health certificate for your dog, the US Customs and Border Protection Agency may want to further inspect your dog for health reasons.

2. Obtain a rabies certificate for your dog. Most countries are not considered rabies-free by the United States government and you will need to provide proof that your dog has been vaccinated against rabies before immigrating to the United States with your dog.

If the dog is under three months of age, it is too young to receive its rabies vaccine and cannot be vaccinated against rabies. If your dog is an unvaccinated dog it will have to bee confined in quarantine until they can be vaccinated and up to 30 days after they are vaccinated.

If you are immigrating to the United States from a country that is rabies free, you will need to provide signed proof from a veterinarian that your dog has spent the last six months in the country with you. You will not need to provide a rabies certificate at the border when you immigrate to the United States.

Are you immigrating to the United States with pets and are worried about crossing the border? Are you just visiting the United States with your dog and are unsure of how to proceed? We can help! Contact our immigration lawyers today for help visiting or immigrating to the United States.

Any information provided here does not constitute legal advice and is intended for general information only. Should you require legal advise, you are encouraged to contact a lawyer directly. All blog postings are public and are not subject to solicitor/client confidentially. Case results depend on a variety of factors unique to each case, and case results do not guarantee or predict a similar result in any further case undertaken by the lawyer.

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